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Reprogrammable Braille is the future for readers with vision problems

Harvard researchers have developed a technology to facilitate the production of books for people with severe vision problems.

Harvard researchers have developed a technology to facilitate the production of books for people with severe vision problems. Books in Braille, historically, present a difficulty of production and distribution, which makes them materials of difficult access for those who need.

The text gets bigger, which demands more material and time for each book. Works such as Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , for example, have more than a thousand pages divided into 14 volumes of heavy braille paper.

Now, researchers have taken a big step toward making it a thing of the past, through reprogrammable braille. The idea was to be able to build a more malleable material to make the pages of the books finer, and the answer was simple: an elastic shell. The dimples are formed in a space similar to an inverted plastic fruit bowl.

Basically, the material is a thin curved elastic shell in which the embossments can be made those that are read with the braille fingers with a simple pen. It is important to note that these setbacks can remain after the force that created them has been removed.

In many ways, the process is similar to how Braille books are produced now, but with this method, the text can be changed at will. The shell will remember the recoil when the force is no longer applied, and the recoil can be erased by stretching the shell out.

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